Colored contacts could add to your style

Are there benefits to using colored contacts

If you’re looking to create a subtle, bold or anywhere in between look, getting colored contact lenses might be the way to go.

Prescription color contacts can correct your myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism while enhancing or completely changing your eye color. Plano color contacts are worn purely for cosmetic purposes and have no lens power to correct vision.

Color contacts come in three kinds of tints:

Visibility tint. This is usually a light blue or green tint added to the lens, just to help you see it better during insertion and removal or if you drop it. Visibility tints are relatively faint and do not affect your eye color.

Enhancement tint. This is a solid but see-through tint that is a little darker than a visibility tint. This is meant to enhance the natural color of your eyes. This type of tint is usually best for people with light-colored eyes and want to make their eyes more intense.

Opaque tint. This is a non-transparent tint that can change your eye color immediately. If you have dark eyes, you’ll need this type of color contact lens to change your eye color.

So, which color should you choose?

Those with light color eyes should choose an enhancement tint that defines the edges of your iris and deepens your natural color if you’re going for a more subtle look. If you want to experiment with a different eye color while still looking natural, you might want to choose a gray or green contact lens if your natural eye color is blue.

Those with dark eyes should choose opaque colored tints. For a natural-looking change, try a lighter honey brown or hazel colored lens. If you want to really stand out from the crowd, go for contact lenses in vivid colors, such as blue, green or violet.

Performance Eyecare carries contacts for ‘hard-to-fit’ eyes

eye doctor in Swansea IL & St. Louis

Not everyone is an ideal candidate for contact lenses. If you have one or more of the following conditions, contact lens wear may be more difficult:

  • astigmatism
  • dry eyes
  • presbyopia
  • giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC)
  • keratoconus
  • post-refractive surgery (such as LASIK)

But “difficult” doesn’t mean impossible. Often, people with these conditions can wear contacts quite successfully. Let’s take a closer look at each situation – and possible contact lens solutions.

Contact lenses for astigmatism

Astigmatism is a very common condition where the curvature of the front of the eye isn’t round, but is instead shaped more like a football or an egg. This means one curve is steeper or flatter than the curve 90 degrees away. Astigmatism won’t keep you from wearing contact lenses – it just means you need a different kind of lens.

Lenses specially designed to correct astigmatism are called “toric” lenses. Most toric lenses are soft lenses. Toric soft lenses have different corrective powers in different lens meridians, and design elements to keep the lens from rotating on the eye (so the varying corrective powers are aligned properly in front of the different meridians of the cornea).

In some cases, toric soft lenses may rotate too much on the eye, causing blur. If this happens, different brands that have different anti-rotation designs can be tried. If soft lens rotation continues to be a problem, gas permeable (GP) lenses (with or without a toric design) can also correct astigmatism.

Dry eyes can make contact lens wear difficult and cause a number of symptoms, including:

  • a gritty, dry feeling
  • feeling as if something is in your eye
  • a burning sensation
  • eye redness (especially later in the day)
  • blurred vision

If you have dry eyes, the first step is to treat the condition. This can be done a number of ways, including artificial tears, medicated eye drops, nutritional supplements, and a doctor-performed procedure called punctal occlusion to close ducts in your eyelids that drain tears away from your eyes.

Once the dry eye condition is treated and symptoms are reduced or eliminated, contact lenses can be tried. Certain soft contact lens materials work better than others for dry eyes. Also, GP lenses are sometimes better than soft lenses if there’s a concern about dry eyes since these lenses don’t dry out the way soft lenses can.

Replacing your contacts more frequently and reducing your wearing time each day (or removing them for specific tasks, such as computer work) can also reduce dry eye symptoms when wearing contacts.

Contact lenses for giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC)

Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory reaction on the inner surface of the eyelids. One cause of GPC is protein deposits on soft contact lenses. (These deposits are from components of your tear film that stick to your lenses and become chemically altered.)

Usually, changing to a one-day disposable soft lens will solve this problem, since you just throw these lenses away at the end of the day before protein deposits can accumulate on them. Gas permeable lenses are also often a good solution, as protein deposits don’t adhere as easily to GP lenses, and lens deposits on GP lenses are more easily removed with daily cleaning.

In some cases of GPC, a medicated eye drop may be required to reduce the inflammation before you can resume wearing contact lenses.

Contact lenses for presbyopia

Presbyopia is the normal loss of focusing ability up close when you reach your 40s.

Today, there are many designs of bifocal and multifocal contact lenses to correct presbyopia. Another option for presbyopia is monovision. This is wearing a contact lens in one eye for distance vision and a lens in the other eye that has a modified power for near vision.

During your contact lens fitting we can help you decide whether bifocal/multifocal contact lenses or monovision is best for you.

Contact lenses for keratoconus

Keratoconus is a relatively uncommon eye condition where the cornea becomes thinner and bulges forward. The term “keratoconus” comes from the Greek terms for cornea (“kerato”) and cone-shaped (“conus”). The exact cause of keratoconus remains unknown, but it appears that oxidative damage from free radicals plays a role.

Gas permeable contact lenses are the treatment option of choice for mild and moderate keratoconus. Because they are rigid, GP lenses can help contain the shape of the cornea to prevent further bulging of the cornea. They also can correct vision problems caused by keratoconus that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or soft contacts.

In some cases, a soft contact lens is worn under the GP lens for greater comfort. This technique is called “piggybacking.” Another option for some patients is a hybrid contact lens that has a GP center, surrounded by a soft “skirt”.Contact lenses after corrective eye surgery

More than one million Americans each year have LASIK surgery to correct their eyesight. Sometimes, vision problems remain after surgery that can’t be corrected with eyeglasses or a second surgical procedure. In these cases, gas permeable contact lenses can often restore visual acuity and eliminate problems like glare and halos at night.

GP lenses are also used to correct vision problems after corneal transplant surgery, including irregular astigmatism that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses.

GP lenses prescribed after LASIK and corneal transplants sometimes have a special design called a “reverse geometry” design to better conform to the altered shape of the cornea. The back surface of these lenses is flatter in the center and steeper in the periphery. (This is the opposite of a normal GP lens design, which is steeper in the center and flattens in the periphery.)

Problem-solving contact lens fittings cost more

Fitting contact lenses to correct or treat any of the above conditions will generally take much more time than a regular contact lens fitting. These “hard-to-fit” cases usually require a series of office visits and multiple pairs of trial lenses before the final contact lens prescription can be determined. Also, the lenses required for these conditions are usually more costly than regular soft contact lenses. Therefore, fees for these fittings are higher than fees for regular contact lens fittings. Call our office for details.

Find out if you can wear contact lenses

If you are interested in wearing contact lenses, call our office to schedule a consultation. Even if you’ve been told you’re not a good candidate for contacts because you have one of the above conditions or for some other reason, we may be able to help you wear contact lenses safely and successfully.

Keep your eyes safe on the golf links

The weather is warming up and many of us will be hitting the links to play a round of golf this spring. Before you take your first swing of the season, make sure you’re wearing the proper golf eyewear.

Did you know Performance Eyecare is one of only a few offices in the St. Louis area to specialize in golf vision and prescription sunglasses for golfing?

It’s important to wear sunglasses when you’re outside to begin with, but many sunglasses aren’t optimized for the game of golf. This is why we carry several different styles of golf sunglasses in our stores.

We all have troubles finding our golf ball from time to time, but it’s become a little easier with the latest eyewear from Rudy Project Ketyium. This eyewear features a green-tinted lens which enhances all green colors and helps enhance the contrast of the white golf ball.

It also has a wrap-style frame to provide greater eye coverage for the golfer and it can also incorporate a prescription.

While finding your golf ball easier is great, the main reason you should wear sunglasses on the golf course is for protection from UV rays. Sunglasses can limit your chances of developing cataracts and possibly macular degeneration as it protects the cornea, lens and other parts of the eye. You should choose sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays.

Stop in soon or schedule an appointment to Performance Eyecare and let us help pick out the best eyewear for your style and health. The eye care professionals at Performance Eyecare give each of our patients the personal attention and care that everyone deserves and ensures that your eye health is our number one priority.

Blurred vision at 40

Blurred Vision Eye Care at Performance Eyecare

Are you 40 years old and beginning to experience blurred near vision when reading or working at the computer? You may have developed presbyopia.

Presbyopia is widespread in the United States as the people in the country are growing older than in previous years. The growing number of older citizens generates a huge demand for eyewear, contact lenses and surgery that can help those with presbyopia deal with their failing vision. According to the World Health Organization, more than a billion people in the world were presbyopic as of 2005.

A major sign that someone has developed presbyopia is when they have to hold books, magazines, newspapers, menus and other reading materials at arm’s length in order to focus properly. When they perform near work, they may develop headaches, eye strain or feel fatigued.

Presbyopia is an age-related process, which differs from astigmatism, nearsightedness and farsightedness. Some treatment options include eyeglasses with bifocal or progressive addition lenses. Reading glasses or multifocal contact lenses are also available.

At Performance Eyecare, we create eyeglass lenses in our office with our state-of-the-art edging instruments.

Surgical options to treat presbyopia are also available, although some surgical procedures correct the problem only temporarily for a limited amount of time.

For more information or to test your eyes for presbyopia, schedule an appointment with your local PEC office!

Are You an Athlete? Let Us Protect Your Eyesight!

Every spring, both professional and amateur athletes head out to the play their favorite sports. And while many people love to look cool sporting their jerseys on the field, it’s important to remember to protect your body from injury, especially your eyes.

Why protect your eyes when playing baseball, basketball, or any other sport? Just imagine an errant pitch or a baseball lost in the sun going right toward your unprotected face. Perhaps another player on the basketball team accidentally hits you in eye with his or her elbow. These instances can cause scratched corneas, fractured eye sockets, and even permanent vision loss, all because you didn’t think it was “cool” to protect your eyesight in front of your friends or rivals.

And think about it – you protect your knees, shoulders, head, and other parts, bones, and joints when you play sports, so why not your eyesight? After all, broken bones and bruises will heal in time, but serious eye injuries can take you off your favorite sport’s roster permanently.

Luckily, we at Performance Eyecare can provide you with your sport’s eyewear needs! Check out some of the great products we offer!

For Baseball Players – America’s favorite pastime is a very visually-demanding sport, especially when you need to hit a 90+ mile per hour fastball. We offer some fantastic, special sunglasses just for you!

For Football Players – Since football players must wear helmets, we recommend that you wear our very own retainer contact lenses and take advantage of the Gentle Vision Shaping System (GVSS).

For Tennis Players – We have many types of lenses that will improve contrast and enhance the color of the yellow tennis ball. We also have lenses that are best for certain weather conditions when playing from sunny to cloudy and everything in between.For Golfers – Did you know that we are one of only a few offices in the St. Louis area to specialize in Golf Vision? That’s right! We carry several different styles of golf sunglasses. The latest is the Rudy Project Ketyium featuring a green-tinted lens that enhances all green colors, thus enhancing the contrast of the white golf ball while it is resting on the green, tee box, or fairway. This wrap-style of frame provides great coverage for the golfer and can also incorporate a prescription.

For Swimmers – Don’t let chlorine get you down! We carry an assortment of swimming and scuba goggles. You can even have your own prescription lenses inserted into them so that you can see whenever you swim.

For the Hunters – We provide several lens tints that can be utilized to achieve optimal visual performance based on various weather conditions,

If you’re ready to get out there and play your sports while protecting your vision, schedule an appointment at your local Performance Eyecare office today!

Eyeglasses for the busy lifestyle

Man sitting at desk holding documents, side view

Do you use the same pair of glasses for everything you do, or do you own a pair of specialty eyeglasses designed for specific tasks?

“One size fits all” is true in some situations, but it’s unlikely that one pair of eyeglasses is suitable in every situation, such as when you’re sitting at the computer or driving a vehicle.

The most important reasons for purchasing specialty eyewear, according to a survey by The Vision Council, include:

  • For a specific activity such as computer use, work, hobbies, sports or driving.
  • To see better in general.
  • For safety reasons to protect the eyes from harm while playing sports.
  • For cosmetic reasons.

Computer Glasses

You are at an increased risk of developing eye strain and other symptoms with the more time you spend sitting at a computer. This is the result of focusing on a very specific area for a long period of time. The computer screen can tire the eyes more quickly than reading a book or newspaper.

Computer glasses are designed for intermediate and close-up distances and will help you avoid eye strain.

Work and Hobbies

If you wear bifocals, you may realize that you have to tip your head back to use the reading zone in the bottom of the glasses. That is unless what you’re reading is in your lap.

You can purchase special work glasses that have the reading segment placed higher in the lenses. Special bifocals and trifocals for work-related tasks are called occupational lenses.

A separate pair of reading glasses might be helpful if some of your hobbies include beading, needlepoint, crafting or anything that requires intense focus at close distances.

Then there is safety glasses that can protect your eyes while working with hand and power tools.

Sports Eyewear

You can improve your visual acuity on the golf course or tennis court by changing the lens tint of sunglasses. Sport-specific eyewear can enhance performance by improving visual clarity while protecting your eyes from injury.

Driving Glasses

There are two categories when it comes to driving glasses: sunglasses designed for driving and prescription eyeglasses.

Sunglasses for driving have polarized lenses that reduce glare and make it easier to see in bright light.

Prescription eyewear for driving includes an appropriate distance prescription and lenses with an anti-reflective coating. This coating reduces glare from light off the front and back of your lenses and allows more light to enter your eyes for better vision when driving at night.

Safety Eyewear

Many people buy specialty eyewear for increased safety, such as safety glasses, sports goggles or shooting glasses.

Safety eyewear is made of ultra-durable materials and provides more coverage than regular glasses.

You can get the latest fashionable specialty eyeglasses at Performance Eyecare. Our team will work with you to discover which prescription works best and looks best so you can see safely in your everyday tasks.

Non-Surgical Vision Correction While You Sleep

VRSS

VRSS, Visual Correction, Performance Eyecare Alton IL, Illinois Eye Doctor

Few things are as precious as our eyesight. When our sight is less than perfect, it reduces our quality of life by making everything more difficult. If you don’t want to wear glasses because they’re bulky on your face or you just dislike the look, and you don’t want to deal with contacts or can’t wear them, and you’re uncomfortable with the idea of having surgery on your eyes, another option to help your vision does exist.

There’s now a new technology, started in 2010, called the Vision Retainer Shaping System. This procedure provides non-surgical vision correction while you sleep. It works similar to a dental retainer, but it’s for your eyes.

The special lenses involved are only worn at night while you sleep. They gradually reshape the cornea to reduce (or even eliminate) myopia or astigmatism. The lenses are comfortable to wear and easy to care for. You’ll feel no pain, and you can wear lenses in both eyes at the same time. Take them out in the morning, and you’ll have clearer vision all day long.

The treatment is most effective on mild to moderate cases. More severe cases may still require additional vision correction. If you’re not happy with the results for any reason, this process is also completely reversible. Simply stop wearing the lenses at night, and your vision will gradually return to its original state.

Because this system doesn’t work on every cornea shape, only specially trained optometrists can evaluate your suitability for this treatment and perform the procedure. The optometrists at the Vision Centers of Performance Eyecare in St. Louis & Illinois have received the special training necessary and have the proper diagnostic equipment and expertise to perform VRSS.

Contact us today for a free consultation. We’ll review your prescription and let you know if the Vision Retainer Shaping System is right for you!

Should I Worry About Eye Floaters?

What are Eye Floaters?

Eye Floater, Eye Floaters, My Doctor Says I have Eye Floaters, Performance Eyecare, Eye care, What Are Eye Floaters

Eye floaters are gray or black spots, squiggly lines, or cobweb-like shapes that drift across your field of vision as you move your eyes. While they may be annoying, they usually do not indicate a serious eye condition.

Causes of Eye Floaters:

Most floaters are the result of age-related changes in the eye. Our eyes are filled with a gel-like substance called vitreous. As we age, this gel can become partially liquefied. This causes collagen protein fibers in the vitreous to clump together and cast shadows on the retina. In rare cases, different eye diseases and disorders can cause floaters or flashbulb-like bursts of light, including

  • a detached or torn retina,
  • bleeding in the vitreous,
  • eye injuries,
  • diabetic retinopathy,
  • eye tumors, or
  • inflammation in the retina or vitreous.

When to See An Eye Doctor:

If you only have a few floaters that do not change over time or significantly interfere with your vision, you do not have to worry. In some instances, they may improve on their own with time. You can also try to move them out of your field of vision by moving your eyes up and down. You should see an eye care professional immediately if you notice

  • floaters associated with sudden flashes of light,
  • a sudden increase in the number of floaters,
  • floaters associated with eye pain,
  • floaters following eye surgery or trauma,
  • a loss of side vision, or
  • your symptoms worsen over time.

These symptoms can be indications of a detached retina or other serious conditions that can lead to permanent vision loss if not treated quickly.

Are Treatments Available For Eye Floaters?

In some instances, a laser can be used to break up large floaters so that they are less noticeable. If you have so many floaters that they significantly interfere with your vision, a surgical procedure is available in which the vitreous is removed and replaced with a saline solution.

Performance Eyecare is proud to offer preventative and emergency eye care services to patients in Creve Coeur, MO; Alton, IL; and Swansea, IL. Contact us today to schedule your appointment.

Customized Eye Prescriptions

Did you know that Performance Eyecare is one of the only eye centers that customizes Eye prescriptions in Scuba Diving Masks in our St. Louis, MO & Swansea, IL area? We provide affordable pricing on specialty lenses made to custom fit into your scuba mask to help you see at distance and also up close to see your gauges and watch.

Or, that we make eyeglasses in the office with our state-of-the-art edging instruments? And that we have a custom selection-process to fit your optical needs and we pick frames according to your face shape, skin tone and brow structure? Our staff and selection makes us the premiere eyecare center in St. Louis.