Get the latest fall fashion glasses at Performance Eyecare

Trends can be hard to keep up with, but we always carry the latest style of eyeglasses at Performance Eyecare.

Rima Kh. of Fashionisers.com points to several trends if eyewear for this fall and winter.

The number one trend is graphical forms in sunglasses. These forms are a variety of squares, triangles, ovals and rounded forms. The shade alternatives add extra character to the glasses and make an impressive fashion statement.

The second trend is oversized sunglasses. The big, opaque sunglasses will give you a sense of style and modernism while hiding your look from the eyes of everyone, if that’s what you’re going for.

The third trend is the cat-eye sunglasses which remain the catchiest and most impressive alternative of the main sunglass trends this season. This style of sunglasses is an awesome solution for people with diverse face shapes and complexions.

The fourth trend is aviators. This look is back on the catwalk this season with different variations to the aviator look. This comeback gives eyeglass wearers a sophisticated and modern look while adding creativity and personality to your complete style.

Massive plastic frames is the fifth trend for this season. This look can make you appear as a strict lady or a mysterious femme fatal. It adds a ton of personality to your complete look as it can add any stylish look and combo to your wardrobe.

Another trend this season is having dark tones in your sunglasses. Buying a pair of stylish opaque sunglasses secures a successful combo for your style. This style completes the combination of opaque textures and designs with modern shapes and interesting garment choices.

Ombre is also a major trend to have for the colder months. These sort half-and-half sunglasses shift from dark to light is an amazing and cool design solution. These sunglasses should be matches with your garment and fine details such as nail polishes.

Your Eyes Benefit From Vitamin E

Which foods can help keep your eyes healthy and reduce your risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration?

Nuts and seeds are a great source for vitamin E, but what is vitamin E? It’s a “powerful antioxidant that helps protect membranes of cells throughout the body against damage caused by metabolic by-products called free radicals,” according to AllAboutVision.com. The harmful radicals can be a result of environmental pollutants such as cigarette smoke.

Recent studies have suggested that vitamin E can prevent cataracts and macular degeneration.

One study from Age-Related Eye Disease Study involved 5,000 people. Researchers discovered a 25 percent lower risk of developing advanced stages of macular degeneration when vitamin E was taken. It also included high levels of vitamin A and C and zinc.

Additional studies also believe vitamin E may help prevent cataracts. There are also some studies that have provided conflicting findings and some eye doctors believe more research needs to be done before coming to a conclusion.

How much vitamin E should we have?

The U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for adults and children 14 or older is 15 mg per day of vitamin E. It’s recommended 19 mg for women who breastfeed. Those who smoke should consume more vitamin E as well as A and C.

What are the best vitamin E foods?

Sunflower seeds and nuts are among the best resources. Other great sources include whole grain cereal, almonds, frozen spinach, hazelnuts, mixed nuts with peanuts, avocado, and dry roasted peanuts.

There are some side effects of too much vitamin E. A 2011 study suggested men 50 years old and older showed an increased risk of prostate cancer when taking 400 IU of vitamin E compared to men who didn’t. It can also interfere with the body’s blood clotting ability.

It’s important to discuss these potential benefits and side effects with an eye care professional at Performance Eyecare and a general physician.

How to Tell if Your Toddler Needs Glasses

Your toddler is not going to know to tell you if something is hard to see or blurry. They do not know what this means or that it is not normal. It is all they are used to. You will need to watch out for signs and do some home tests to check your child’s vision. If you are concerned about your child’s vision, you should make an appointment with their optometrist.

An easy sign to watch out for is if your child is sitting to close to the television. If your child is doing this, ask them to scoot back and see if they keep moving back. Toddlers could be sitting so close because they are excited. Once you have them move back, if they keep scooting forward it could be an eye issue.

Another similar sign, is if your child’s face is extremely close to the paper they are coloring on all the time. We all get close to papers every once in a while, but a continual habit of this, is a sign your child is having difficulties seeing.

Squinting is another sign of vision issues. We have all squinted when trying to see something in the distance, but if your child is squinting very often you should have them checked out.

Playing vision games with your child is a great test to see if there is an issue. As you are driving in the care or walking down the street, ask your child if they see things off in the distance. Have them describe the item to you by color, shape or what it is near. Have your child shut one eye and then the other to test each eye separately.

Your child should have their first eye exam around 3 or 4. Do not wait until they get to school. That way if there is a vision problem, you can get it corrected and your child used to glasses before school begins.

Never leave home without your sunglasses

More than half of 10,000 Americans polled didn’t know the health benefits of sunglasses and 27 percent stated they never wear sunglasses.

One main health benefit of wearing sunglasses is to protect against skin cancer.

According to SkinCancer.org, five to 10 percent of all skin cancers are on the eyelid. Some of the skin cancers found on the eyelid are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Only five percent of the skin cancers on the eyelid are melanoma.

The signs of eyelid cancers are highly variable. They are often scar-like in appearance or texture. One study out of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found the most common symptoms of skin cancer on the eyelids included a mass or tumor (42 patients); ulceration or sore (33 patients); altered appearance (10 patients); a red spot (five patients); ingrown eyelashes (two patients).

It’s recommended that you rub sunscreen on your upper and lower eyelids to protect from UV rays.

Sunglasses are also key to protection from UV rays. Many studies have shown a photo-protective effect from both prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses. Sunglasses are more effective in blocking the harmful UV rays than prescription eyeglasses.

At Performance Eyecare, our eye doctors will set you up with the perfect pair of eyeglasses or sunglasses to match your style while protecting you from harmful UV rays. Schedule an appointment with us to ensure your eye will be protected this spring as you begin to head outdoors more.

Performance Eyecare is the place for children’s glasses

With the kids going back to school, it’s time to bring them in for an eye exam and pick out any necessary eyewear to help him or her succeed this school year.

We understand kids can be picky about what they want to wear, but we’re confident your child will find the perfect pair of glasses at Performance Eyecare.

Here are the five trends in children’s eyewear:

  1. Designers have taken cool and classic designs that work for adults and scaled them down for kids. Don’t be surprised if your child wants eyeglasses that look a lot like yours.
  2. Branded or licensed eyewear lines grab a child’s attention. Fisher-Price, Hush Puppies, Stride Rite, Disney and Marvel Comics appeal to kids of all ages, but especially to very young children. Lines related to extreme sports (X-Games), basketball (Nike, Converse) and other sports are very popular with slightly older kids.
  3. Spring hinges, strong and flexible frame materials and impact-resistant polycarbonate or Trivex lenses all help protect your child’s eyes — as well as your financial investment in his or her eyewear.
  4. Don’t forget about sunglasses for kids. Protecting your child’s eyes from the sun’s harmful UV rays may lower the risk of adult eye problems like cataracts later in life.
  5. Photochromic lenses made of impact-resistant polycarbonate are an excellent choice for kids who spend a lot of time outdoors. Clip-on sunglasses (or newer versions that magnetically attach to eyeglasses) also are good choices.
  6. For the child who is fast becoming a teenager, eyewear fashion is increasingly important. Designer eyeglass frames from Guess?, Calvin Klein and others are very appealing to “tweens.” Also popular are frames branded with apparel and accessories names such as Esprit, Nine West and Banana Republic, as well as celebrity brands like Hilary Duff and Thalia eyewear collections.

Children’s Glasses

With the kids going back to school in a few short weeks, it’s time to bring them in for an eye exam and pick out any necessary eyewear to help him or her succeed this school year.

We understand kids can be picky about what they want to wear, but we’re confident your child will find the perfect pair of glasses at Performance Eyecare.

Here are the five trends in children’s eyewear, according to Erinn Morgan:

  1. Designers have taken cool and classic designs that work for adults and scaled them down for kids. Don’t be surprised if your child wants eyeglasses that look a lot like yours.
  2. Branded or licensed eyewear lines grab a child’s attention. Fisher-Price, Hush Puppies, Stride Rite, Disney and Marvel Comics appeal to kids of all ages, but especially to very young children. Lines related to extreme sports (X-Games), basketball (Nike, Converse) and other sports are very popular with slightly older kids.
  3. Spring hinges, strong and flexible frame materials and impact-resistant polycarbonate or Trivex lenses all help protect your child’s eyes — as well as your financial investment in his or her eyewear.
  4. Don’t forget about sunglasses for kids. Protecting your child’s eyes from the sun’s harmful UV rays may lower the risk of adult eye problems like cataracts later in life.
  5. Photochromic lenses made of impact-resistant polycarbonate are an excellent choice for kids who spend a lot of time outdoors. Clip-on sunglasses (or newer versions that magnetically attach to eyeglasses) also are good choices.
  6. For the child who is fast becoming a teenager, eyewear fashion is increasingly important. Designer eyeglass frames from Guess?, Calvin Klein and others are very appealing to “tweens.” Also popular are frames branded with apparel and accessories names such as Esprit, Nine West and Banana Republic, as well as celebrity brands like Hilary Duff and Thalia eyewear collections.

Colored contacts could add to your style

Are there benefits to using colored contacts

If you’re looking to create a subtle, bold or anywhere in between look, getting colored contact lenses might be the way to go.

Prescription color contacts can correct your myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism while enhancing or completely changing your eye color. Plano color contacts are worn purely for cosmetic purposes and have no lens power to correct vision.

Color contacts come in three kinds of tints:

Visibility tint. This is usually a light blue or green tint added to the lens, just to help you see it better during insertion and removal or if you drop it. Visibility tints are relatively faint and do not affect your eye color.

Enhancement tint. This is a solid but see-through tint that is a little darker than a visibility tint. This is meant to enhance the natural color of your eyes. This type of tint is usually best for people with light-colored eyes and want to make their eyes more intense.

Opaque tint. This is a non-transparent tint that can change your eye color immediately. If you have dark eyes, you’ll need this type of color contact lens to change your eye color.

So, which color should you choose?

Those with light color eyes should choose an enhancement tint that defines the edges of your iris and deepens your natural color if you’re going for a more subtle look. If you want to experiment with a different eye color while still looking natural, you might want to choose a gray or green contact lens if your natural eye color is blue.

Those with dark eyes should choose opaque colored tints. For a natural-looking change, try a lighter honey brown or hazel colored lens. If you want to really stand out from the crowd, go for contact lenses in vivid colors, such as blue, green or violet.

PeC has the latest trends in performance sunglasses

Performance EyeCare Illinois Sport Sunglasses

The interest in performance-oriented sunglasses has surged in recent years, as well as outdoor activities such as mountain biking, snowboarding, rock climbing, kayaking, skiing, golfing and in-line skating.

The boom in outdoor sports activities like mountain biking, snowboarding, rock climbing, kayaking, skiing, golfing and in-line skating has also created a demand for sports- and performance-oriented sunglasses.

These special-purpose sunglasses are designed to be exceptionally light and comfortable, able to withstand extreme conditions and stay comfortably in place during any activity.

Lenses

Perhaps the most important aspect of effective sports sunwear is the optical quality and visual enhancement properties of the lenses. In particular, sports and performance lenses are available in a wide variety of tints to modify light in certain ways to enhance contrast. This allows you to see certain objects (a tennis ball, for example) with greater clarity to enhance your reaction time.

Polycarbonate lenses are the lens of choice for most sport sunglasses because they are lightweight, super strong and more impact-resistant than lenses made of other materials.

Polarized lenses are also in demand, because they reduce glare from light reflecting off flat surfaces such as water or a field of snow. There is, however, some debate about the advisability of polarized lenses for sports like downhill and mogul skiing, since seeing sunlight reflecting from icy patches on the slopes is often beneficial.

Frames

The frames for performance and sport sunglasses are made of lightweight and durable materials such as polyamide, which keeps its shape even under stress. Styles are typically aerodynamic, with sleek lines. No-slip temple grips and nose pads are popular features to help keep the eyewear in place despite wearer perspiration during the heat of competition.

What’s your sport?

Each sport has its own unique visual requirements, which has led to the development of sport-specific sunglasses. Frames and lenses are now available that are targeted specifically to the golfer, the cyclist, the boater, the rock climber and so on.

For example, a certain lens tint might help a golfer notice subtle changes in the direction of the blades of grass on a green that could affect the line of their putt, while a completely different tint might be better to help a hunter see the contrast of a flying bird against an overcast sky.

If you prefer to be a Jack (or Jill) of all sports, there are also multipurpose sports sunglasses that feature interchangeable lenses with different tints for different sports and lighting conditions.

For more information on prescription sunglasses, visit your local Performance Eyecare location!

Eyeglass Fashion For Teens

portrait of a teenage girl wearing eyeglasses

We understand that teenagers can have extremely picky taste when it comes to anything, but especially when it involves fashion.

Here are five tips to help you look fabulous in your new eyeglasses:

Tip 1: Eyeglass frames should complement your face shape, features and coloring

If your face is angular or square, round and oval frames look best. The opposite is also true: if your face is round or oval, you’ll look good in square and angular frames. Also, if the top of your face is wider than the bottom (often called heart-shaped), select a frame with a dramatic (wider, heavier, etc.) bottom edge to even out your face. Of course, if your face is wider on the bottom, choose a frame with a dramatic top edge.

The frame color should complement your coloring, including skin tone (warm or cool), skin color (ranging from fair to dark) and hair color.

Still not sure? Take a look at your veins (they’re easy to see in your wrists and feet, usually): if they seem mostly greenish, you have warm skin, while mostly blue veins mean you have cool skin.

Colors that look nice with warm skin include browns, most metals and colors like turquoise.

Those who are light in skin and hair coloring (ivory skin and blonde hair, for example) look nice with faint-colored frames. Those with medium coloring look nice with light-colored metals and browns. Those with dark coloring look nice is most metallic frames.

Tip 2: Frames must fit you properly to work right and look good

Frames that are too large can cause visual distortion and glare. If it’s too small, you limit your peripheral vision.

Frames shouldn’t be wider than the widest part of your face, with the exception of frames for oval faces. The top of the frames should not be above the eyebrow line and the bottom shouldn’t touch your cheeks. They should also be comfortable around your ears.

Tip 3: They should match your lifestyle

Take into account your life. That means your life on Saturday night, your life at church, your life at grandma’s house and more. What is your overall style? Choose something that pairs well with your typical style whether it’s dressy of jeans and T-shirts.

Tip 4: Certain prescriptions work better with certain frames

Eyeglass lenses that correct nearsightedness are thicker along the edges than in the middle. The opposite is true for farsightedness. Some frames are incompatible with lens edges that are particularly thick or thin.

Tip 5: Construction varies

Generally you can choose eyeglass frames in plastic, metal or a combination of both. Metal frame usually last longer and most have adjustable nose pads, which work well for those with noses too small or large for plastic frames.

You should take into account the kind of jewelry you like to wear as well. If you wear a lot of gold, you might not want silver frames.

At Performance Eyecare, we carry over 700 pairs of high quality and designer eyeglasses and sunglasses. We have eyeglasses of all price ranges, including high end fashion frames made from the latest materials.

Makeup Tips for Ladies with Glasses

Performance Eyecare in Swansea, IL and St. Louis has the perfect designer eyeglass frames for your style.

It’s important to find the perfect designer eyeglass frames to fit your style. That includes your attire’s style and your makeup style. At Performance Eyecare, we understand that it can be a tough choice to pick out the perfect pair of eyeglasses which is why we carry a large selection.

Here are a few trendy tips, courtesy of AllAboutVision.com, for the next time you pick out a pair of eyeglasses:

Lighten Up

Some eyeglasses can cast dark shadows around the eyes in certain light, so blend a lighter-toned foundation under your eyes and down the center of your nose, otherwise known as contouring.

You can also fully contour your face by bronzing your cheek bones, the top of your forehead and either side of your nose.

Just Browsing

Your eyebrow styling depends on the size and shape of your eyewear, as well as the thickness and contour of your eyebrows.

You might want to avoid heavy eyebrow makeup if you wear big, bold frames. Same goes for those with naturally light hair or thinner eyebrows. You don’t want to fill in your eyebrows with a color that’s too dark or make them appear too full.

For those who wear smaller, subtle frames, fill in your eyebrows with your natural color to help draw attention to your eyes.

On the Lid

It’s not always the best choice to pair bold frames with subtle, natural-looking eye makeup. You can play up your eyes with striking cat-eye eyeliner, highly defined eyelashes and pops of eye shadow. Remember to complement the color of your frames if you choose a bright eye shadow color.

Read My Lips

If you have eye-catching eyeglasses and love dramatic eye shadow, skip the bold lip and pair your look with a colorless gloss or slightly tinted lip balm.

You can also pass up the dramatic eyes and wear thin eyeliner, mascara and a bright-colored lipstick. This look is especially cute with vintage-style glasses.

At Performance Eyecare, we have hundreds of fashionable designer eyeglasses to choose from to give you that “wow” factor you have been looking for. Schedule an appointment or stop in soon to take a look!

Performance Eyecare carries contacts for ‘hard-to-fit’ eyes

eye doctor in Swansea IL & St. Louis

Not everyone is an ideal candidate for contact lenses. If you have one or more of the following conditions, contact lens wear may be more difficult:

  • astigmatism
  • dry eyes
  • presbyopia
  • giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC)
  • keratoconus
  • post-refractive surgery (such as LASIK)

But “difficult” doesn’t mean impossible. Often, people with these conditions can wear contacts quite successfully. Let’s take a closer look at each situation – and possible contact lens solutions.

Contact lenses for astigmatism

Astigmatism is a very common condition where the curvature of the front of the eye isn’t round, but is instead shaped more like a football or an egg. This means one curve is steeper or flatter than the curve 90 degrees away. Astigmatism won’t keep you from wearing contact lenses – it just means you need a different kind of lens.

Lenses specially designed to correct astigmatism are called “toric” lenses. Most toric lenses are soft lenses. Toric soft lenses have different corrective powers in different lens meridians, and design elements to keep the lens from rotating on the eye (so the varying corrective powers are aligned properly in front of the different meridians of the cornea).

In some cases, toric soft lenses may rotate too much on the eye, causing blur. If this happens, different brands that have different anti-rotation designs can be tried. If soft lens rotation continues to be a problem, gas permeable (GP) lenses (with or without a toric design) can also correct astigmatism.

Dry eyes can make contact lens wear difficult and cause a number of symptoms, including:

  • a gritty, dry feeling
  • feeling as if something is in your eye
  • a burning sensation
  • eye redness (especially later in the day)
  • blurred vision

If you have dry eyes, the first step is to treat the condition. This can be done a number of ways, including artificial tears, medicated eye drops, nutritional supplements, and a doctor-performed procedure called punctal occlusion to close ducts in your eyelids that drain tears away from your eyes.

Once the dry eye condition is treated and symptoms are reduced or eliminated, contact lenses can be tried. Certain soft contact lens materials work better than others for dry eyes. Also, GP lenses are sometimes better than soft lenses if there’s a concern about dry eyes since these lenses don’t dry out the way soft lenses can.

Replacing your contacts more frequently and reducing your wearing time each day (or removing them for specific tasks, such as computer work) can also reduce dry eye symptoms when wearing contacts.

Contact lenses for giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC)

Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC) is an inflammatory reaction on the inner surface of the eyelids. One cause of GPC is protein deposits on soft contact lenses. (These deposits are from components of your tear film that stick to your lenses and become chemically altered.)

Usually, changing to a one-day disposable soft lens will solve this problem, since you just throw these lenses away at the end of the day before protein deposits can accumulate on them. Gas permeable lenses are also often a good solution, as protein deposits don’t adhere as easily to GP lenses, and lens deposits on GP lenses are more easily removed with daily cleaning.

In some cases of GPC, a medicated eye drop may be required to reduce the inflammation before you can resume wearing contact lenses.

Contact lenses for presbyopia

Presbyopia is the normal loss of focusing ability up close when you reach your 40s.

Today, there are many designs of bifocal and multifocal contact lenses to correct presbyopia. Another option for presbyopia is monovision. This is wearing a contact lens in one eye for distance vision and a lens in the other eye that has a modified power for near vision.

During your contact lens fitting we can help you decide whether bifocal/multifocal contact lenses or monovision is best for you.

Contact lenses for keratoconus

Keratoconus is a relatively uncommon eye condition where the cornea becomes thinner and bulges forward. The term “keratoconus” comes from the Greek terms for cornea (“kerato”) and cone-shaped (“conus”). The exact cause of keratoconus remains unknown, but it appears that oxidative damage from free radicals plays a role.

Gas permeable contact lenses are the treatment option of choice for mild and moderate keratoconus. Because they are rigid, GP lenses can help contain the shape of the cornea to prevent further bulging of the cornea. They also can correct vision problems caused by keratoconus that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or soft contacts.

In some cases, a soft contact lens is worn under the GP lens for greater comfort. This technique is called “piggybacking.” Another option for some patients is a hybrid contact lens that has a GP center, surrounded by a soft “skirt”.Contact lenses after corrective eye surgery

More than one million Americans each year have LASIK surgery to correct their eyesight. Sometimes, vision problems remain after surgery that can’t be corrected with eyeglasses or a second surgical procedure. In these cases, gas permeable contact lenses can often restore visual acuity and eliminate problems like glare and halos at night.

GP lenses are also used to correct vision problems after corneal transplant surgery, including irregular astigmatism that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses.

GP lenses prescribed after LASIK and corneal transplants sometimes have a special design called a “reverse geometry” design to better conform to the altered shape of the cornea. The back surface of these lenses is flatter in the center and steeper in the periphery. (This is the opposite of a normal GP lens design, which is steeper in the center and flattens in the periphery.)

Problem-solving contact lens fittings cost more

Fitting contact lenses to correct or treat any of the above conditions will generally take much more time than a regular contact lens fitting. These “hard-to-fit” cases usually require a series of office visits and multiple pairs of trial lenses before the final contact lens prescription can be determined. Also, the lenses required for these conditions are usually more costly than regular soft contact lenses. Therefore, fees for these fittings are higher than fees for regular contact lens fittings. Call our office for details.

Find out if you can wear contact lenses

If you are interested in wearing contact lenses, call our office to schedule a consultation. Even if you’ve been told you’re not a good candidate for contacts because you have one of the above conditions or for some other reason, we may be able to help you wear contact lenses safely and successfully.

Choosing the right glasses for your child

Just the thought of buying eyeglasses for your child can make you want to pull your hair out. First, there is the initial selection to consider. Second, you must consider what your child is willing to wear. Third, which eyeglasses will be the most durable?

Then there is the pressure from your child, who is likely more worried about what the other kids might say and if their glasses look cool to others.

We’ve seen how stressful this process can be. Don’t worry, we’re here to help make it a lot smoother for everyone involved.

As noted by Liz DeFranco of AllAboutVision.com, there are other variables to this journey such as what kind of glasses are needed (near- or farsighted) and how often will they be worn.

Here are DeFranco’s 10 items to consider when buying kids’ eyewear.

1. Lens Thickness

It’s important to consult with the optician about the eyeglass prescription before looking at frames. Stronger lenses are likely going to be thick, so it is important to keep the frames as small as possible to reduce the final lens thickness.

2. Fashion

Sadly, other kids might comment with either nice compliments or unnecessary jokes about your child’s eyeglasses. It is important your child is comfortable with his/her new specs so don’t let them choose ones that you think might be a cause for concern with other kids later.

The goal is to get your child to wear the glasses.

3. Plastic or Metal

Children’s frames are made of either plastic or metal. Boys’ frames have double bridges while girls’ frames have single frames, which can also be unisex.

Plastic frames in the past were considered a better choice for children because they were more durable, less likely to be bent or broken, lighter in weight and less expensive.

Now manufacturers are creating metal frames to incorporate these features as well.

Also, ask for hypoallergenic materials if your child has shown sensitivity to certain substances, such as nickel.

4. Proper Bridge Fit

Children’s noses aren’t fully developed which makes this a tough part of the consideration process. They don’t have a bridge to prevent plastic frames from sliding down, but metal frames are usually made with adjustable nose pads to fit everyone’s bridge.

5. Temple Style

Temples that wrap all the way around the back of the ear, called “cable temples,” help keep glasses from sliding down or falling off your child’s face completely.

Another option is a strap that goes around the head.

6. Spring Hinges

A nice feature to look for is temples with spring hinges because kids aren’t always careful when they put on or take off glasses. Spring hinges can prevent the need for frequent adjustments to be made to the glasses.

7. Lens Material

Children’s lenses should be made of polycarbonate or a material called Trivex because the lightweight materials are more impact-resistant than other lens materials. They are also lighter in weight, have built-in protection from damaging UV rays, and are scratch-resistant coated by the manufacturer.

The least desirable material is glass. It must be treated for impact resistance, but it still shatters when it breaks which can be hazardous to the eye.

8. Sports Eyewear

If your kid plays sports, a proper sports goggle with polycarbonate lenses will provide the best protection against an eye injury. These goggles also must be fitted properly.

9. Warranties

If your child is a toddler or a first-time wearer, opt for a warranty if it’s offered. Not all warranty plans are the same, but it can be useful in case the eyewear needs to be replaced or fixed.

10. Backup Pair

It’s always good to have a backup pair of glasses because kids aren’t always the gentlest being to their belongings. Another pair might be best especially for those with strong prescriptions and wouldn’t be able to function without their glasses.

Ask your optician if special discounts apply for second pairs, especially if they’re purchased at the same time as the primary pair.