Protect your eyes from the allergy season

78629531

Allergies usually bring about the sneezing and nasal congestion in a lot of us, but it can also affect your eyes. Luckily, eye allergies can be treated with the same self-help strategies used to clear out the nasal allergies.

According to WebMD.com, one in five Americans suffer from eye allergies – also known as ocular allergies or allergic conjunctivitis. The symptoms pose “little threat” to eyesight and are otherwise just plain annoying.

So what happens if you take over-the-counter allergy medicine and you continue to have red, itchy and puffy eyes? You should seek help from a doctor as these can be caused by infections and other conditions that could damage your eyesight.

You have seasonal allergies if your allergies only happen at certain times of the year. These are caused usually by pollen in the air from grass and trees. Perennial allergies happen throughout the year and are caused by pet dander and dust mites.

What can you do to control eye allergies?

WebMD.com suggests you stay indoors when pollen count is at its highest, such as mid-morning and early evening, and close the windows and run the air conditioner. Wear sunglasses if you do decide to go outside.

You should also limit your exposure to dust mites and wash your bedding frequently. It’s recommended you clean your floors with a damp mop and replace rugs and carpets if you have pets.

It’s difficult, but try not to rub your eyes when you start having symptoms. It’ll only make the symptoms worse.

If these at-home remedies, seek help from a doctor. There are plenty of over-the-counter and prescription medications that can provide some relief.

The doctors at Performance Eyecare are available to help ease your eye allergies and to rule out any eye infections. If you begin to have symptoms, please don’t wait to schedule an appointment to see us.

More information: http://www.webmd.com/allergies/eye-allergies

 

Treat Fall allergies

Performance eyecare STL & red eye, pink eye, dry eye & more

According to WebMD.com, fall allergy triggers are different from the spring and summer ones but can cause just as many symptoms.

Ragweed is the king of fall allergy season. It usually begins releasing pollen in August, but it can last through September and into October. Seventy-five percent of people who are allergic to spring plants are also allergic to ragweed.

Ragweed pollen can travel hundreds of miles with help from the wind, so you could still have allergies from it despite not living near it.

Those allergic to ragweed may also find similar symptoms from foods like bananas, melon, zucchini and other fruits and vegetables.

Mold is another allergy sufferer’s worst nightmare. Many of us think of mold growing in our basement or bathrooms, but mold spores also love wet spots outside. Piles of damp leaves are ideal breeding grounds for mold.

Dust mites are more common in humid summer months, but can be stirred into the air the first time you turn your furnace on. This pesky allergy producer can make you sneeze, wheeze and have runny noses. It’s also common in schools, so kids going back to school may have already experienced it this season.

Fall allergy symptoms include: runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing, coughing, itchy eyes and nose, and dark circles under the eyes.

So how can you manage these symptoms? Pollen is usually at its peak in the morning, so stay indoors with the doors and windows closed.

Also, clean your heating vents and change the filter before using your heat for the first time. Use a HEPA filter in your heating system to remove pollen, mold and other particles from the air.

You should also use a humidifier to keep the air between 35% and 50% humidity.

Lastly, we all hate raking leaves, but we hate them a little extra when we have allergies. You should wear a mask when you rake the leaves so you don’t breathe in mold spores.

Click here for more information.

At Performance Eyecare, we can treat our patients for many eye conditions, including red eyes, dry eyes, pink eye and eye infection. Be sure to schedule an appointment with us if you are having trouble with your vision.