Choosing the right glasses for your child

Just the thought of buying eyeglasses for your child can make you want to pull your hair out. First, there is the initial selection to consider. Second, you must consider what your child is willing to wear. Third, which eyeglasses will be the most durable?

Then there is the pressure from your child, who is likely more worried about what the other kids might say and if their glasses look cool to others.

We’ve seen how stressful this process can be. Don’t worry, we’re here to help make it a lot smoother for everyone involved.

As noted by Liz DeFranco of AllAboutVision.com, there are other variables to this journey such as what kind of glasses are needed (near- or farsighted) and how often will they be worn.

Here are DeFranco’s 10 items to consider when buying kids’ eyewear.

1. Lens Thickness

It’s important to consult with the optician about the eyeglass prescription before looking at frames. Stronger lenses are likely going to be thick, so it is important to keep the frames as small as possible to reduce the final lens thickness.

2. Fashion

Sadly, other kids might comment with either nice compliments or unnecessary jokes about your child’s eyeglasses. It is important your child is comfortable with his/her new specs so don’t let them choose ones that you think might be a cause for concern with other kids later.

The goal is to get your child to wear the glasses.

3. Plastic or Metal

Children’s frames are made of either plastic or metal. Boys’ frames have double bridges while girls’ frames have single frames, which can also be unisex.

Plastic frames in the past were considered a better choice for children because they were more durable, less likely to be bent or broken, lighter in weight and less expensive.

Now manufacturers are creating metal frames to incorporate these features as well.

Also, ask for hypoallergenic materials if your child has shown sensitivity to certain substances, such as nickel.

4. Proper Bridge Fit

Children’s noses aren’t fully developed which makes this a tough part of the consideration process. They don’t have a bridge to prevent plastic frames from sliding down, but metal frames are usually made with adjustable nose pads to fit everyone’s bridge.

5. Temple Style

Temples that wrap all the way around the back of the ear, called “cable temples,” help keep glasses from sliding down or falling off your child’s face completely.

Another option is a strap that goes around the head.

6. Spring Hinges

A nice feature to look for is temples with spring hinges because kids aren’t always careful when they put on or take off glasses. Spring hinges can prevent the need for frequent adjustments to be made to the glasses.

7. Lens Material

Children’s lenses should be made of polycarbonate or a material called Trivex because the lightweight materials are more impact-resistant than other lens materials. They are also lighter in weight, have built-in protection from damaging UV rays, and are scratch-resistant coated by the manufacturer.

The least desirable material is glass. It must be treated for impact resistance, but it still shatters when it breaks which can be hazardous to the eye.

8. Sports Eyewear

If your kid plays sports, a proper sports goggle with polycarbonate lenses will provide the best protection against an eye injury. These goggles also must be fitted properly.

9. Warranties

If your child is a toddler or a first-time wearer, opt for a warranty if it’s offered. Not all warranty plans are the same, but it can be useful in case the eyewear needs to be replaced or fixed.

10. Backup Pair

It’s always good to have a backup pair of glasses because kids aren’t always the gentlest being to their belongings. Another pair might be best especially for those with strong prescriptions and wouldn’t be able to function without their glasses.

Ask your optician if special discounts apply for second pairs, especially if they’re purchased at the same time as the primary pair.

Stylish frames to look younger!

Getting older doesn’t mean you have to settle for the grandma look when it comes to glasses. Take a look at these tips to consider the next time you pair a new set of frames.

As noted by Julyne Derrick of Beauty.About.com, there are many frames and styles that will help you achieve a more youthful look.

Black frames are a classy look that show sophistication and a sense of style. These frames can be oversized but they will still appear flattering. It’s recommended you steer away from excessive jewelry and other accessories to pull off the black frame look.

Want a subtle look when wearing glasses? Try a frameless pair that won’t bring attention to your glasses. They will blend into the face better, as will thin frames. Frameless glasses also let off a sophisticated look.

There’s three things you should consider when you choose glasses. Most of us think about our face shape, but it’s also about hair color and personality. Square frames can balance out a longer face shape and black frames can complement a lighter hair color.

Don’t go alone when you’re shopping for eyeglasses. Always bring a friend who knows your style and can be honest with you. No one wants to buy a pair of frames and later find out they don’t look as flattering as they previously thought.

At Performance Eyecare, we offer designer frames of the highest quality and also affordable name brands such as Lafont, Oakley, Oliver Peoples, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Tom Davies, OGA, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, OGI and many others.

PEC Grows Through the Pandemic, Becoming Largest Independently Owned Provider in the STL Area

While many local businesses have closed their doors since the pandemic began, one St. Louis entrepreneur has used the uncertain times to grow into the largest independently owned eyecare provider in the St. Louis area.

Since March of 2020, Performance Eyecare has expanded from 4 locations to 9 across the St. Louis Metro plus Columbia, MO. Even in the tight labor market, their team has expanded to over 50 members, and has grown from 4 to 12 eye doctors on staff. Gross revenue has increased from $3.6M to a projected $9M this year – and they’re not done growing yet. 

Performance Eyecare founder Dr. Dirk Massie is a St. Louis local who has always seen potential in the Midwest market. “Our community is dominated by big corporate healthcare conglomerates who care more about the quantity of people coming through the door than the quality of service they receive. When it comes to something as important as someone’s ability to see, people deserve to work with a doctor who cares as much as they do.”

“Patient retention is extremely important to our team,” says Dr. Massie. “Our goal isn’t just to get new people in the door – we love to watch our patients grow up, have families, and bring their kids in to see us as well.” 

When asked about the key to their impressive retention rates, he shares, “Our offices are designed to put people totally at ease. From a comfortable, no-puff exam, to kind and knowledgeable doctors, to a welcoming, friendly face greeting you when you walk in the door, we help people actually enjoy their eye doctor experience.”  

Dr. Massie credits his team for the much of the business’ success over the last few years. The staff has thrived under the challenging environment of the pandemic, as well as adapting to the quick growth of the company. “The biggest thing we look for in our hiring process is a positive attitude. We can teach the skills people need to get the job done. But it’s the people who enjoy a fast-paced environment and feeling empowered to make business decisions who really thrive.”

Choosing glasses for style & personality!

Let your choice in eye wear express who you are and showcase your unique individual style.

Performance Eyecare has the perfect glasses to fit your style and personality

We all have different tastes, especially when it comes to style. That’s why it’s important to decide what you want your eyeglasses to say about you first.

As noted by Erinn Morgan of AllAboutVision.com, the first step is to consider the aspects of your life. We all have different aspects to our life, such as work and play, so sometimes it’s best to buy a couple pairs of glasses to suit each aspect.

Eyeglasses for Serious Business

It’s best to wear conservative frame shapes and colors in the business setting. Doing so will help instill trust and confidence with your clients and colleagues.

Some of the best choices are classic shapes such as ovals, rectangles and almonds. You should also choose a traditional color like gold, silver, brown, gray and black. If you choose to wear plastic glasses, stay away from bright colors or unusual shapes.

Eyeglasses That Showcase Your Creativity and Fashion Savvy

Those wanting to show their fashionable and creative tastes should choose modern shapes when picking out their eyeglasses. You have a lot more options than in the business setting so choosing prints, such as animal or flower, can also be an option to accentuate your style.

Eyeglasses for the Modern Baby Boomer or Senior

Many older people tend to choose for a conservative look, but they don’t have to stick with the same outdated one forever.

Certain colors can make you look younger, such as deep browns and burgundy for men and lighter, shinier hues for women.

Eyeglasses for Students

Unusual shapes, bright colors, larger sizes and interesting details are popular among students who are trying to create their own identity and style.

Students shouldn’t be afraid to express themselves in any variety of glasses.

Eyeglasses for the Busy Mom and Dad

Ovals, upswept rectangles and soft cat-eye shapes are functional and look great for the busy mom or dad.  You could choose to amplify the fashion effect of a basic shape with details such as jewelry-like metal accents or recognizable designer logos depending on your style.

Interesting colors such as plum deep red, soft green and black can add a fashion edge to a basic frame.

Performance Eyecare conducts stress-free eye exams

Performance EyeCare STL Eye Examination

We understand the word “exam” can add some unnecessary stress to your life, so we wanted to share with you what a routine comprehensive eye exam usually consists of:

As noted by Gary Heiting, OD, and Jennifer Palombi, OD, the following is what makes up a routine eye exam:

Visual Acuity Test

This measures the sharpness of your vision and it’s usually performed with a projected eye chart to measure the distance visual acuity. It also consists of a small, handheld acuity chart to measure your near vision as well.

Color Blindness Test

This test can check your color vision as well as alert your eye doctor to any possible eye health problems that may affect your color vision.

Cover Test

During this test, your eye doctor will have you focus on a small object across the room and will then cover each of your eyes alternately while you stare at the target. The doctor then assesses whether the uncovered eye must move to pick up the fixation target, which could indicate strabismus or a more subtle binocular vision problem that could cause eye strain or amblyopia, known as “lazy eye.”

Retinoscopy

Your eye doctor may perform this test early in the eye exam to obtain an approximation of your eyeglass prescription.

In retinoscopy, the room lights will be dimmed and you will be given a large target (usually the big “E” on the chart) to fixate on. As you stare at the “E,” your eye doctor will shine a light at your eye and flip lenses in a machine in front of your eyes.

Refraction

During a refraction, the doctor puts the instrument called a phoropter in front of your eyes and shows you a series of lens choices. He or she will then ask you which of the two lenses in each choice looks clearer.

Based on your answers, your eye doctor will continue to fine-tune the lens power until reaching a final eyeglass prescription.

Autorefractors and Aberrometers

An autorefractor, like a manual refraction, determines the lens power required to accurately focus light on your retina. Autorefractors are especially useful in certain cases such as evaluating young children who may not sit still, pay attention or interact with the eye doctor adequately for an accurate manual refraction.

Slit-Lamp Examination

The slit lamp, also called a biomicroscope, allows your eye doctor to get a highly magnified view of the structures of your eye to thoroughly evaluate your eye health and detect any signs of infection or disease.

During this test, your doctor will have you place your chin on the chin rest of the slit lamp and will then shine the lamp’s light at your eye. The doctor looks through a set of oculars (much like a microscope in a science lab) and examines each part of your eye in turn.

He or she will first examine the structures of the front of your eye (lids, cornea, conjunctiva, iris, etc.). Then, with the help of a special high-powered lens, your doctor will view the inside of your eye (retina, optic nerve, macula and more).

The Glaucoma Test

A common glaucoma test is the “puff-of-air” test, technically known as non-contact tonometry, or NCT. (This test was immortalized on the hit TV show Friends, when Rachel couldn’t sit still for it.)

For NCT, the test begins with you putting your chin on the machine’s chin rest. While you look at a light inside the machine, the doctor or a trained assistant will puff a small burst of air at your open eye. It is completely painless, and the tonometer does not touch your eye.

At Performance Eyecare, we do not use the air puff. Instead, our doctors instills an eye drop and determines your eye pressure while looking with the microscope. There is no pain and this method is much more accurate than blowing air into your eye.

Pupil Dilation

To obtain a better view of the eye’s internal structures, your eye doctor instills dilating drops to enlarge your pupils. Dilating drops usually take about 20 to 30 minutes to start working. When your pupils are dilated, you will be sensitive to light (because more light is getting into your eye) and you may notice difficulty focusing on objects up close. These effects can last for up to several hours, depending on the strength of the drop used.

Once the drops have taken effect, your eye doctor will use various instruments to look inside your eyes. You should bring sunglasses with you to your eye exam, to minimize glare and light sensitivity on the way home. If you forget to bring sunglasses, the staff usually will give you a disposable pair.

Visual Field Test

In some cases, your eye doctor may want to check for the possible presence of blind spots (scotomas) in your peripheral or “side” vision by performing a visual field test. These types of blind spots can originate from eye diseases such as glaucoma.

Analysis of blind spots also may help identify specific areas of brain damage caused by a stroke or tumor.

Dry Eyes and Allergen Problems? We Can Help!

There are many unpleasant feelings in this world – an itch you can’t reach to scratch, having a hangnail or two, and, of course, dry, itchy eyes that never seem to go away!

Allergen problems are oftentimes hereditary and happen due to processes that are associated with other types of allergic responses. When an allergic reaction takes place, your eyes may be overreacting to something that they perceive as harmful, even though it usually isn’t harmful. These usually harmless substances that bother your eyes so much are called allergens!

One very common allergen that most people experience problems with is dust. It is harmless to most people, but in allergic individuals, dust can cause an excessive production of mucus and tears in the eyes.

Did you know that about 30% to 50% of all residents in the United States have allergy symptoms and problems? About 75% of those symptoms also affect the eyes!

What Are The Symptoms?

How do you know you are experiencing trouble with allergens? Here are the typical symptoms one experiences when combating allergens:

  • Red, swollen, or itchy eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing and coughing
  • Itchy nose, mouth, or throat
  • Headache from sinus congestion
  • Fatigue and a lack of sleep

How To Deal With Dry Eyes

What can you do if you’re experiencing dry eyes and problems with allergies? We recommend the following tips to help you through allergen issues:

Avoid The Triggers – One of the most common pieces of advice given to those who suffer from allergens is to avoid whatever causes your eye allergy to flare up as much as you possibly can. If you have dry, itchy eyes, do your best to keep your home free of dust and pet dander, and remember to keep your pets off of the furniture. When the pollen count is high, stay indoors with the air conditioner on. During the cold months, use high quality furnace filters, which will trap common allergens. Be sure also to replace your furnace filters frequently.

Take Medicine – If you’re unsure what’s causing your eye allergies to flare up or you cannot avoid the allergens that affect you, your next best bet is to probably take some medicine to at least help alleviate the symptoms you might be experiencing. You can also take over-the-counter drops, but be sure to ask your doctor which kind of eye drop is right for you!

Use Eye Drops – Nothing feels as refreshing and alleviating as eye drops to dry, itchy eyes. Eye drops may have one or more active ingredients to help with symptoms such as antihistamines, decongestants, or mast cell stabilizers that inhibit inflammation. Be sure to talk to your doctor or to me about using eye drops for your dry eyes!

Talk to Me If You Wear Contact Lenses – You may generally wear contact lenses pretty successfully, but allergies can make your contacts uncomfortable or even unbearable. Airborne allergens can get on your lenses and can also stimulate the excessive production of natural substances in your tears. These can bind to your contacts and cause blurry vision and even more discomfort to occur. Ask us about eye drops that can help relieve your symptoms and also help keep your contact lenses clean.

Try Daily Disposable Contact Lenses – If you wear contact lenses and experience allergy problems, you may want to consider acquiring daily disposable contact lenses, which you discard at the end of the day. Because you replace these types of contacts much more frequently than usual, you are unlikely to develop irritating deposits that can build up over time and cause or increase any allergy-related discomfort you may feel.

If you’re experiencing dry eyes and allergy problems and would like to make an appointment, give your local Performance Eyecare office a call or schedule your appointment online. You don’t have to suffer from dry, itchy eyes – just come see us, and we can make your eyes feel so much better!

Show Your Eyes You Love Them With These 8 Simple Eye Care Tips!

You can tell that Valentine’s Day is on its way right now. Every day there are more and more advertisements on the television about jewelers and Hallmark cards, and many radio stations may soon be playing more love songs as Valentine’s Day approaches.

If you think about it, many of those love songs tend to include eyes. Think about it – there’s “In Your Eyes” by Peter Gabriel, “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” by Frankie Valli, and “Brown Eyed Girl,” by Van Morrison.

It makes sense, though – as William Blake once said, “The eyes are the windows to the soul.” We place great value on our eyes and vision, and we wish to give them the best care we possibly can. All to often, however, life gets in the way. We become busy or we simply forget to do a few easy things to keep our eyes healthy and strong.

This Valentine’s Day, don’t just show your love to your special someone by serenading them with these songs (and other great love songs out there) – show much you love and care for your eyes by following these 8 simple eye care tips!

VeggiesEat the Right Foods

Many studies have shown that several nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, lutein, and vitamins C and E can help fight off or slow down age-related vision issues such as cataracts and Macular Degeneration. Be sure to regularly eat the following foods to keep your eyes healthy:

  • Leafy green veggies like spinach, kale, and collards
  • Salmon, tuna, and other oily fish
  • Oranges and other citrus fruits
  • Eggs, nuts, beans, and other non-meat protein sources

Keep in mind also that eating the proper food will not only keep your eyes healthy and your weight maintained, but it will also lower your chances of getting Type II Diabetes, which is the leading cause of blindness in adults. What a win-win reason to eat more healthily!

Stop Smoking

If there’s another reason to help you quit smoking, it’s probably this – smoking has been found to increase your risk of getting cataracts, Macular Degeneration, and optic nerve damage. Show your eyes how much you care by quitting smoking!

Protect Your Eyes from Injury

Did you know that about 325,000 sports-related eye injuries occur every year? Perhaps more frightening than that statistic is the fact that more than 90% of those injuries could have been prevented with proper eyewear! When you partake in your favorite hobbies or sports, be sure to wear the proper eyewear. Remember, you only have one pair of eyes. Protect them well!

Avoid Eye Strain As Much As Possible

Computers and smart phones are fantastic inventions and help us accomplish so much these days, but spending so much time in front of them has harmed our eyes. By spending lots of time in front of the bright screen, you can strain your eyes or get dry eyes or blurred vision. Be sure that your computer monitor is 5-9 inches below eye level and that the brightness isn’t very high. Also, be sure to abide by the 20/20/20 rule – every 20 minutes you are looking at the screen, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds to help keep your eyes healthy and well-focused.

Say “No” to UV Rays

Did you know that ultraviolet rays can harm your eyes as much as they can harm your skin? It’s true! In fact, every 15 minutes you are outside adds to the cumulative effect of radiation damage you have accrued. Fight against UV rays by wearing sunglasses or contact lenses that are UV protective. Remember, even if you wear contacts, you’ll still need to wear sunglasses to protect the whites of your eyes.

Be Smart When Driving at Night

Nighttime driving can be hard on the eyes, and since it’s still dark out around rush hour, it’s still an inevitable part of life for commuters. When driving in the dark, try to look at the bottom right of the road whenever you’re able (especially as cars are coming toward you on the other side of the road). Make sure, also, that you use the night setting on your rearview mirror to help reduce headlight glare behind you!

Take Proper Care of Your Contacts

Contacts might seem scary to new users, but they’re actually pretty easy to care for. However, contacts must be kept clean. Every single time you put in your lenses or take them out of your eyes, rinse them out with contact solution. Change the solution in the contact holder every time so that you don’t risk infecting your contacts. Also, don’t fall asleep in your contacts unless your eye doctor gives you instructions to do so.

Get an Eye Exam Every Year

The scary thing about eye problems is that more often than not, they tend to sneak up on you slowly or progress without being detected. Your eye doctor can take a look into your eyes and ensure that your eyes are truly healthy. Your doctor can also tell you if your glasses or contacts are still benefitting your vision and can update your prescription, if need be.

Want to show your eyes some love? Schedule your next eye exam with us at Performance Eyecare! Just give us a call at (618) 234-3053 in Swansea or (314) 878-1377 in St. Louis. We would be more than happy to take a look at your eyes!

Are You an Athlete? Let Us Protect Your Eyesight!

Every spring, both professional and amateur athletes head out to the play their favorite sports. And while many people love to look cool sporting their jerseys on the field, it’s important to remember to protect your body from injury, especially your eyes.

Why protect your eyes when playing baseball, basketball, or any other sport? Just imagine an errant pitch or a baseball lost in the sun going right toward your unprotected face. Perhaps another player on the basketball team accidentally hits you in eye with his or her elbow. These instances can cause scratched corneas, fractured eye sockets, and even permanent vision loss, all because you didn’t think it was “cool” to protect your eyesight in front of your friends or rivals.

And think about it – you protect your knees, shoulders, head, and other parts, bones, and joints when you play sports, so why not your eyesight? After all, broken bones and bruises will heal in time, but serious eye injuries can take you off your favorite sport’s roster permanently.

Luckily, we at Performance Eyecare can provide you with your sport’s eyewear needs! Check out some of the great products we offer!

For Baseball Players – America’s favorite pastime is a very visually-demanding sport, especially when you need to hit a 90+ mile per hour fastball. We offer some fantastic, special sunglasses just for you!

For Football Players – Since football players must wear helmets, we recommend that you wear our very own retainer contact lenses and take advantage of the Gentle Vision Shaping System (GVSS).

For Tennis Players – We have many types of lenses that will improve contrast and enhance the color of the yellow tennis ball. We also have lenses that are best for certain weather conditions when playing from sunny to cloudy and everything in between.For Golfers – Did you know that we are one of only a few offices in the St. Louis area to specialize in Golf Vision? That’s right! We carry several different styles of golf sunglasses. The latest is the Rudy Project Ketyium featuring a green-tinted lens that enhances all green colors, thus enhancing the contrast of the white golf ball while it is resting on the green, tee box, or fairway. This wrap-style of frame provides great coverage for the golfer and can also incorporate a prescription.

For Swimmers – Don’t let chlorine get you down! We carry an assortment of swimming and scuba goggles. You can even have your own prescription lenses inserted into them so that you can see whenever you swim.

For the Hunters – We provide several lens tints that can be utilized to achieve optimal visual performance based on various weather conditions,

If you’re ready to get out there and play your sports while protecting your vision, schedule an appointment at your local Performance Eyecare office today!

How to tell if Your Child Needs Glasses

Keeping your children happy and healthy is a parent’s number one concern. It is easy to tell when your child feels ill and needs to see a doctor, but how do you know if your child is having difficulties seeing?

There are common signs that your child is having difficulty seeing. If your child is showing one or more of the below signs, you should contact your eye doctor for an examination.

Avoiding activities?

The first way to tell if your child has a vision problem is when they won’t take part in fun activities such as coloring, reading or making things with their hands. Although every child has certain activities they dislike due to personal preferences – a child who decides to sit out while their friends play with bricks, coloring books and games may be suffering from poor vision.

Tired eyes?

Being a child can be exhausting; all that running around in the yard, playing with friends and making hideouts out of bedding would cause anyone to be tired. But there is a line between when your child should be rubbing their eyes due to tiredness (around naptime or bedtime) and when they may be feeling discomfort in their eyes. A child who rubs their eyes, or has watery or red eyes on more than one occasion, may also be struggling to see.

Sitting too close to TV and games consoles?

Another warning sign – and usually the most obvious one – is when your child turns on the TV and sits too close to the screen. In the average living room the TV may be approximately 5 meters away from your couch; an acceptable distance. If you see your child sitting very close to the screen, you may have a problem.

Headaches and frowning?

It’s normal for the occasional bump and bruise as your child explores their world and is active in the classroom. But if your child walks around rubbing her head regularly, complaining of a headache or squinting around bright lights – she may have a vision problem. When we have poor eyesight we find it hard to focus on objects either close up or at a distance. If you need a visual aid but don’t use one, your eyes work overtime to try and focus on that object. This causes  muscles in the back of the eye to tense up, resulting in headaches over the eyes.

Lack of concentration?

Another way to tell if your child has a vision problem is their inability to focus on the task in hand. Those same muscles are working overtime to focus, which can cause your child to feel restless and uncomfortable. The result is them not paying attention for long periods of time at school or at home.

What to do: 

If you feel your child may have a vision problem, and she exhibits one or more of the signs mentioned above, it is really important that you take them to an optometrist as soon as possible. Speak to your child about your concerns and explain that an eye test is not painful. If it turns out that your child does need glasses, gently tell them that this is the case and remember that wearing glasses is not a bad thing. There are many glasses styles available for kids, so not only will they look fashionable and cool – they will also be more comfortable in the classroom and participating in activities.

Eyeglass Styles For Men

Style is important in every setting, which is why it’s important to choose frames that not only feel good, but also look good.

Picking out the perfect pair of eyeglasses can be tough for anyone. While getting the correct prescription is the most important thing for eyeglass wearers, you shouldn’t settle for bland looking glasses that don’t fit your personality and style.

According to Antonio Centeno, the founder of Real Men Real Style, men need to consider at least five things when choosing their next pair of glasses: should they be noticeable, face shape, color, sizing and materials.

1. Should a man’s glasses be noticeable?

The traditional thought is that glasses should be unobtrusive, which is impossible to achieve even with the thinnest wire frames.

The thin-wire frame look may not be the best look for your face, but it’s also important not to let whichever pair you buy define your style. Glasses are meant to complement your style and a fashionable pair can become a part of your visual identity.

Don’t let the old tradition of thin-wire glasses be your style if it isn’t. Choose a pair of glasses that enhance your style even if it is the traditional thin-wire glasses.

At Performance Eyecare, we offer designer frames of the highest quality and also affordable name brands such as Lafont, Oakley, Oliver Peoples, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Tom Davies, OGA, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, OGI and many others.

2. Face shape

It’s important to keep your style in mind when choosing glasses, but don’t forget your face shape. Keeping your face shape in consideration will determine which frame shape is best for you.

Glasses for round faces

A “round” face is considered to be the same width and height with a curving chin and cheeks. Centeno suggests something angular and slimming for people with a round face.

Rectangular glasses will make your face appear longer and thinner. The corners of the glasses should be squared off and the frames should lean toward thin more than thick.

Glasses for square faces

A “square” face is similar to a round face in that it’s equal in width and height, but its features are more angled with a broad chin and strong jaw. Men who want to soften their impression can wear rounded lenses. Those who want a stronger profile and don’t want the glasses to look imposing can still wear squared-off lenses, but need to be sure the lenses are large and even in width and height.

Glasses for oval faces

“Oval” faces work well with most styles as long as you don’t go too extreme. An oval face is taller than it is wide with a rounded chin and high cheekbones. Oval faces can wear both squared-off and curving frames, narrow or wide.

The thing to look out for is if the frames are too square or circular. A thicker frame can add definition, but make sure it doesn’t overpower your features.

Glasses for heart-shaped faces

“Heart-shaped” faces have narrow cheekbones and a small chin. If you want to take away from your narrow chin, then choose wider frames at the top than the bottom. It’s also important to stay away from too block or squared-off because of the curves in your face’s shape.

3. Choosing the color

Most people wear the same glasses for years, so you better get used to the color. Men who wear suits and ties have a limited dress code which also narrows down the color selection for frames. Base metallic colors (gold and silver tones) or a fine black are acceptable. Suit-and-tie men should avoid thick, plastic-looking or brightly colored frames.

Casual dressers have a greater number of options to add colors, either as the solid base of the frames or as detailing. Thinner frames are best for men looking to add color.

4. Frame sizing

The rule of thumb here is that thinner frames will generally sit more comfortably and allow a closer fit. Large, heavy frames may need to be sized looser than normal.

Eyeglass frames are sized with three numbers representing in order: size of the lens, size of the bridge across the nose, and the length of the temples (the hooks that go over your ears). These measurements don’t take into account the shape of the wires or the thickness which means one set of frames may not be as comfortable as another with the identical measurement.

5. Frame materials

Plastics and nylon-based composites are usually used for brightly colored glasses. Higher-end sports glasses are made from more flexible nylon materials.

Titanium and titanium alloys are popular for their flexibility and the lighter weight. People with sensitive skin need to be more cautious with cheaper metals because some include nickel, which some have a contact allergy.

Aluminum frames are cheap, but not durable.

Glasses to Aid Kids’ computer vision

Prevent Computer Vision Syndrome

Did you know October is considered Computer Learning Month? We’re not here to teach you how to use the computer better, but to inform you of computer vision syndrome, especially for children who are likely to use the computer more often.

Take a look at these facts and figures from Gary Heiting, OD and Larry K. Wan, OD:

  • 94 percent of American families with children have a computer in the home with access to the Internet.*
  • The amount of time children ages 8 to 18 devote to entertainment media (including computer and video games) each day has increased from 6.19 hours in 1999 to 7.38 hours in 2009.**
  • In 2009, 29 percent of American children ages 8 to 18 had their own laptop computer, and kids in grades 7 through 12 reported spending an average of more than 90 minutes a day sending or receiving texts on their cell phones.**

Sitting in front of the computer screen stresses a child’s eyes because it forces them to focus and strain a lot more than any other task. This can put them at an even greater risk than adults for developing symptoms of computer vision syndrome.

According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), parents should consider these factors affecting children and computer use:

  • Children may not be aware of how much time they are spending at a computer. They may perform a task on the computer for hours with few breaks. This prolonged activity can cause eye focusing and eye strain problems.
  • Children are very adaptable. They assume that what they see and how they see is normal — even if their vision is problematic. That’s why it is important for parents to monitor the time a child spends working at a computer and make sure they have regular eye exams as directed by their optometrist or ophthalmologist.
  • Children are smaller than adults. Since computer workstations often are arranged for adult use, this can change the viewing angle for young children. Computer users should view the screen slightly downward, at a 15-degree angle. Also, if a child has difficulty reaching the keyboard or placing their feet comfortably on the floor, he or she may experience neck, shoulder and/or back pain.

Here are tips to reduce the risk of computer vision syndrome in children, according to the AOA:

  1. Have your child’s vision checked. Before starting school, every child should have a comprehensive eye exam, including near-point (computer and reading) and distance testing.
  2. Limit the amount of time your child spends at the computer without a break. Encourage kids to take 20-second breaks from the computer every 20 minutes to minimize the development of eye focusing problems and eye irritation. (Some eye doctors call this the “20-20 rule.”)
  3. Check the ergonomics of the workstation. For young and small children, make sure the computer workstation is adjusted to their body size. The recommended distance between the monitor and the eye for children is 18 to 28 inches. Viewing the computer screen closer than 18 inches can strain the eyes.
  4. Check the lighting. To reduce glare, windows and other light sources should not be directly visible when sitting in front of the monitor. Reduce the amount of lighting in the room to match the computer screen.

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