Stylish frames to look younger!

Getting older doesn’t mean you have to settle for the grandma look when it comes to glasses. Take a look at these tips to consider the next time you pair a new set of frames.

As noted by Julyne Derrick of Beauty.About.com, there are many frames and styles that will help you achieve a more youthful look.

Black frames are a classy look that show sophistication and a sense of style. These frames can be oversized but they will still appear flattering. It’s recommended you steer away from excessive jewelry and other accessories to pull off the black frame look.

Want a subtle look when wearing glasses? Try a frameless pair that won’t bring attention to your glasses. They will blend into the face better, as will thin frames. Frameless glasses also let off a sophisticated look.

There’s three things you should consider when you choose glasses. Most of us think about our face shape, but it’s also about hair color and personality. Square frames can balance out a longer face shape and black frames can complement a lighter hair color.

Don’t go alone when you’re shopping for eyeglasses. Always bring a friend who knows your style and can be honest with you. No one wants to buy a pair of frames and later find out they don’t look as flattering as they previously thought.

At Performance Eyecare, we offer designer frames of the highest quality and also affordable name brands such as Lafont, Oakley, Oliver Peoples, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Tom Davies, OGA, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, OGI and many others.

Adult Sunglasses at Performance Eyecare

Performance Eyecare St. Louis

While summer is winding down, it’s important to continue to protect your eyes with UV-blocking sunglasses, such as ones that you can find at Performance Eyecare.

As noted by GetEyeSmart.org, we often spend more time in the sun during the summer which increases our chances of developing cataracts and growths in the eye, including cancer. This risk also applies to those who go to tanning beds for their bronze look.

Do you remember that brightness when the sun reflected off a fresh snowfall six months ago? Well, that can cause photokeratitis, which is responsible for snow blindness. This same effect can happen when you’re at the beach or a pool as the sun reflects off the sand or water. This is why it’s always important to wear UV-blocking glasses when you’re out in the sun.

A survey conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), only about half of people who wear sunglasses say they check the UV rating before picking out their pair. The AAO recommends the following:

1. Wear sunglasses labeled as 100% UV protection.

It’s important to wear glasses that protect both UV-A and UV-B rays and are labeled either as UV400 or 100% UV protection.

2. Wear a hat along with your glasses

This is self-explanatory as a hat can help keep the sun away from your eyes. Clouds don’t block UV light, so sunglasses are important to wear even on cloudy days.  And remember that sun rays are strong. So strong they can pass through haze and clouds. Remember: sun damage can happen at any time of year.

3. Stay inside during UV-intense times

The sun’s light is strongest mid-day to early afternoon, at higher altitudes, and when reflected off of water, ice or snow. It’s important to remember this when you leave the house.

As Performance Eyecare, we offer designer frame sunglasses that will not only look stylish on you, but more importantly protect your vision from the sun’s harmful rays.

Performance Eyecare conducts stress-free eye exams

Performance EyeCare STL Eye Examination

We understand the word “exam” can add some unnecessary stress to your life, so we wanted to share with you what a routine comprehensive eye exam usually consists of:

As noted by Gary Heiting, OD, and Jennifer Palombi, OD, the following is what makes up a routine eye exam:

Visual Acuity Test

This measures the sharpness of your vision and it’s usually performed with a projected eye chart to measure the distance visual acuity. It also consists of a small, handheld acuity chart to measure your near vision as well.

Color Blindness Test

This test can check your color vision as well as alert your eye doctor to any possible eye health problems that may affect your color vision.

Cover Test

During this test, your eye doctor will have you focus on a small object across the room and will then cover each of your eyes alternately while you stare at the target. The doctor then assesses whether the uncovered eye must move to pick up the fixation target, which could indicate strabismus or a more subtle binocular vision problem that could cause eye strain or amblyopia, known as “lazy eye.”

Retinoscopy

Your eye doctor may perform this test early in the eye exam to obtain an approximation of your eyeglass prescription.

In retinoscopy, the room lights will be dimmed and you will be given a large target (usually the big “E” on the chart) to fixate on. As you stare at the “E,” your eye doctor will shine a light at your eye and flip lenses in a machine in front of your eyes.

Refraction

During a refraction, the doctor puts the instrument called a phoropter in front of your eyes and shows you a series of lens choices. He or she will then ask you which of the two lenses in each choice looks clearer.

Based on your answers, your eye doctor will continue to fine-tune the lens power until reaching a final eyeglass prescription.

Autorefractors and Aberrometers

An autorefractor, like a manual refraction, determines the lens power required to accurately focus light on your retina. Autorefractors are especially useful in certain cases such as evaluating young children who may not sit still, pay attention or interact with the eye doctor adequately for an accurate manual refraction.

Slit-Lamp Examination

The slit lamp, also called a biomicroscope, allows your eye doctor to get a highly magnified view of the structures of your eye to thoroughly evaluate your eye health and detect any signs of infection or disease.

During this test, your doctor will have you place your chin on the chin rest of the slit lamp and will then shine the lamp’s light at your eye. The doctor looks through a set of oculars (much like a microscope in a science lab) and examines each part of your eye in turn.

He or she will first examine the structures of the front of your eye (lids, cornea, conjunctiva, iris, etc.). Then, with the help of a special high-powered lens, your doctor will view the inside of your eye (retina, optic nerve, macula and more).

The Glaucoma Test

A common glaucoma test is the “puff-of-air” test, technically known as non-contact tonometry, or NCT. (This test was immortalized on the hit TV show Friends, when Rachel couldn’t sit still for it.)

For NCT, the test begins with you putting your chin on the machine’s chin rest. While you look at a light inside the machine, the doctor or a trained assistant will puff a small burst of air at your open eye. It is completely painless, and the tonometer does not touch your eye.

At Performance Eyecare, we do not use the air puff. Instead, our doctors instills an eye drop and determines your eye pressure while looking with the microscope. There is no pain and this method is much more accurate than blowing air into your eye.

Pupil Dilation

To obtain a better view of the eye’s internal structures, your eye doctor instills dilating drops to enlarge your pupils. Dilating drops usually take about 20 to 30 minutes to start working. When your pupils are dilated, you will be sensitive to light (because more light is getting into your eye) and you may notice difficulty focusing on objects up close. These effects can last for up to several hours, depending on the strength of the drop used.

Once the drops have taken effect, your eye doctor will use various instruments to look inside your eyes. You should bring sunglasses with you to your eye exam, to minimize glare and light sensitivity on the way home. If you forget to bring sunglasses, the staff usually will give you a disposable pair.

Visual Field Test

In some cases, your eye doctor may want to check for the possible presence of blind spots (scotomas) in your peripheral or “side” vision by performing a visual field test. These types of blind spots can originate from eye diseases such as glaucoma.

Analysis of blind spots also may help identify specific areas of brain damage caused by a stroke or tumor.

Performance Eyecare has same day contact lenses

Woman holding contact lens to eye

There’s no need to sit around waiting and wondering when your prescription contact lenses are going to be finished. At Performance Eyecare, we have several hundred contact lenses in our office and can routinely fit our contact lens patients the same day. It is not uncommon to hear from our new contact lens patients, “You mean you have MY contact lens prescription here and I can take my contact lenses home today?”

If you’re new to wearing contact lenses, Liz Segre of AllAboutVision.com has some tips to help you with common questions:

Is my contact lens inside out?

The trick is to place the lens on your finger so that a cup is formed. Then hold the lens up directly in front of your eyes so you’re looking at the side of the cup.

If the lens forms a “U” with the top edges flared out, it’s inside out. If it forms just a “U,” it’s in the correct position.

Applying your contact lenses

Make sure you wash your hands thoroughly before applying your contact lenses, but avoid scented or oily soaps that might adhere to the lens surface. Especially avoid using products containing lanolin and moisturizing lotions.

Some eye doctors say to always apply the first contact lens in the same eye, so you’ll avoid the possibility of mixing up lenses for the right eye and left eye.

Other basic guidelines for contact lens application:

  1. Gently shake your lens case containing the storage solution, to loosen the contact lens should it be stuck. (Don’t try pulling at the lens with your finger, or you might damage it.)
  2. Slide the lens out of its case and into the palm of your hand. Rinse thoroughly with the appropriate contact lens solution.
  3. Place the contact lens on the tip of your index or middle finger, which should be dry or mostly dry.
  4. With the fingers and thumb of your other hand, simultaneously pull up on your upper eyelid and down on your lower eyelid.
  5. Position the lens on your eye while looking upward or forward, whichever you find to be easier. You also can apply the contact lens by placing it on the white of the eye closest to your ear.
  6. Gently close your eye, roll your eyes in a complete circle to help the lens settle, and then blink.
  7. Look closely in the mirror to make sure the lens is centered on your eye. If it is, the lens should be comfortable and your vision should be clear.

Removing your contact lenses

Always wash your hands before removing contact lenses. If you are standing in front of a sink, use a clean paper towel to cover the drain where the contact lens might accidentally fall.

To remove soft contact lenses, look upward or sideways while you pull down on your lower eyelid. With a finger, gently maneuver the lens onto the white of your eye. There, you can very gently pinch the lens together with your index finger and thumb and lift it off the eye.

Rigid contact lenses can be removed by holding out the palm of your hand, bending over, and then opening your eye wide. With one finger of your other hand, pull the skin between your upper and lower eyelid (just outside the lateral aspect of your eye) outward toward your ear with your eye wide open. Then blink. The contact lens should pop right out and into your open palm.

15 Facts About Your Eyes

Eyes are very complex and interesting organs. There are seven main parts in the eye that play a role in transmitting information to the brain, detecting light, and focusing. A problem with any of these parts means a problem with your vision.

Here are 15 interesting facts about eyes that you probably didn’t know:

  1. The average blink lasts for about 1/10th of a second.
  2. While it takes some time for most parts of your body to warm up to their full potential, your eyes are on their “A game” 24/7.
  3. Eyes heal quickly. With proper care, it only takes about 48 hours for the eye to repair a corneal scratch.
  4. Seeing is such a big part of everyday life that it requires about half of the brain to get involved.
  5. Newborns don’t produce tears. They make crying sounds, but the tears don’t start flowing until they are about 4-13 weeks old.
  6. Around the world, about 39 million people are blind and roughly 6 times that many have some kind of vision impairment.
  7. Doctors have yet to find a way to transplant an eyeball. The optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain is too sensitive to reconstruct successfully.
  8. The cells in your eye come in different shapes. Rod-shaped cells allow you to see shapes, and cone-shaped cells allow you to see color.
  9. You blink about 12 times every minute.
  10. Your eyes are about 1 inch across and weigh about 0.25 ounce.
  11. Some people are born with two differently colored eyes. This condition is heterochromia.
  12. Even if no one in the past few generations of your family had blue or green eyes, these recessive traits can still appear in later generations.
  13. Each of your eyes has a small blind spot in the back of the retina where the optic nerve attaches. You don’t notice the hole in your vision because your eyes work together to fill in each other’s blind spot.
  14. Out of all the muscles in your body, the muscles that control your eyes are the most active.
  15. 80% of vision problems worldwide are avoidable or even curable.

Have any more questions about eyes? Let us help! Schedule an appointment with us today!

Eyeglass Styles For Men

Style is important in every setting, which is why it’s important to choose frames that not only feel good, but also look good.

Picking out the perfect pair of eyeglasses can be tough for anyone. While getting the correct prescription is the most important thing for eyeglass wearers, you shouldn’t settle for bland looking glasses that don’t fit your personality and style.

According to Antonio Centeno, the founder of Real Men Real Style, men need to consider at least five things when choosing their next pair of glasses: should they be noticeable, face shape, color, sizing and materials.

1. Should a man’s glasses be noticeable?

The traditional thought is that glasses should be unobtrusive, which is impossible to achieve even with the thinnest wire frames.

The thin-wire frame look may not be the best look for your face, but it’s also important not to let whichever pair you buy define your style. Glasses are meant to complement your style and a fashionable pair can become a part of your visual identity.

Don’t let the old tradition of thin-wire glasses be your style if it isn’t. Choose a pair of glasses that enhance your style even if it is the traditional thin-wire glasses.

At Performance Eyecare, we offer designer frames of the highest quality and also affordable name brands such as Lafont, Oakley, Oliver Peoples, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Tom Davies, OGA, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, OGI and many others.

2. Face shape

It’s important to keep your style in mind when choosing glasses, but don’t forget your face shape. Keeping your face shape in consideration will determine which frame shape is best for you.

Glasses for round faces

A “round” face is considered to be the same width and height with a curving chin and cheeks. Centeno suggests something angular and slimming for people with a round face.

Rectangular glasses will make your face appear longer and thinner. The corners of the glasses should be squared off and the frames should lean toward thin more than thick.

Glasses for square faces

A “square” face is similar to a round face in that it’s equal in width and height, but its features are more angled with a broad chin and strong jaw. Men who want to soften their impression can wear rounded lenses. Those who want a stronger profile and don’t want the glasses to look imposing can still wear squared-off lenses, but need to be sure the lenses are large and even in width and height.

Glasses for oval faces

“Oval” faces work well with most styles as long as you don’t go too extreme. An oval face is taller than it is wide with a rounded chin and high cheekbones. Oval faces can wear both squared-off and curving frames, narrow or wide.

The thing to look out for is if the frames are too square or circular. A thicker frame can add definition, but make sure it doesn’t overpower your features.

Glasses for heart-shaped faces

“Heart-shaped” faces have narrow cheekbones and a small chin. If you want to take away from your narrow chin, then choose wider frames at the top than the bottom. It’s also important to stay away from too block or squared-off because of the curves in your face’s shape.

3. Choosing the color

Most people wear the same glasses for years, so you better get used to the color. Men who wear suits and ties have a limited dress code which also narrows down the color selection for frames. Base metallic colors (gold and silver tones) or a fine black are acceptable. Suit-and-tie men should avoid thick, plastic-looking or brightly colored frames.

Casual dressers have a greater number of options to add colors, either as the solid base of the frames or as detailing. Thinner frames are best for men looking to add color.

4. Frame sizing

The rule of thumb here is that thinner frames will generally sit more comfortably and allow a closer fit. Large, heavy frames may need to be sized looser than normal.

Eyeglass frames are sized with three numbers representing in order: size of the lens, size of the bridge across the nose, and the length of the temples (the hooks that go over your ears). These measurements don’t take into account the shape of the wires or the thickness which means one set of frames may not be as comfortable as another with the identical measurement.

5. Frame materials

Plastics and nylon-based composites are usually used for brightly colored glasses. Higher-end sports glasses are made from more flexible nylon materials.

Titanium and titanium alloys are popular for their flexibility and the lighter weight. People with sensitive skin need to be more cautious with cheaper metals because some include nickel, which some have a contact allergy.

Aluminum frames are cheap, but not durable.

Glasses to Aid Kids’ computer vision

Prevent Computer Vision Syndrome

Did you know October is considered Computer Learning Month? We’re not here to teach you how to use the computer better, but to inform you of computer vision syndrome, especially for children who are likely to use the computer more often.

Take a look at these facts and figures from Gary Heiting, OD and Larry K. Wan, OD:

  • 94 percent of American families with children have a computer in the home with access to the Internet.*
  • The amount of time children ages 8 to 18 devote to entertainment media (including computer and video games) each day has increased from 6.19 hours in 1999 to 7.38 hours in 2009.**
  • In 2009, 29 percent of American children ages 8 to 18 had their own laptop computer, and kids in grades 7 through 12 reported spending an average of more than 90 minutes a day sending or receiving texts on their cell phones.**

Sitting in front of the computer screen stresses a child’s eyes because it forces them to focus and strain a lot more than any other task. This can put them at an even greater risk than adults for developing symptoms of computer vision syndrome.

According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), parents should consider these factors affecting children and computer use:

  • Children may not be aware of how much time they are spending at a computer. They may perform a task on the computer for hours with few breaks. This prolonged activity can cause eye focusing and eye strain problems.
  • Children are very adaptable. They assume that what they see and how they see is normal — even if their vision is problematic. That’s why it is important for parents to monitor the time a child spends working at a computer and make sure they have regular eye exams as directed by their optometrist or ophthalmologist.
  • Children are smaller than adults. Since computer workstations often are arranged for adult use, this can change the viewing angle for young children. Computer users should view the screen slightly downward, at a 15-degree angle. Also, if a child has difficulty reaching the keyboard or placing their feet comfortably on the floor, he or she may experience neck, shoulder and/or back pain.

Here are tips to reduce the risk of computer vision syndrome in children, according to the AOA:

  1. Have your child’s vision checked. Before starting school, every child should have a comprehensive eye exam, including near-point (computer and reading) and distance testing.
  2. Limit the amount of time your child spends at the computer without a break. Encourage kids to take 20-second breaks from the computer every 20 minutes to minimize the development of eye focusing problems and eye irritation. (Some eye doctors call this the “20-20 rule.”)
  3. Check the ergonomics of the workstation. For young and small children, make sure the computer workstation is adjusted to their body size. The recommended distance between the monitor and the eye for children is 18 to 28 inches. Viewing the computer screen closer than 18 inches can strain the eyes.
  4. Check the lighting. To reduce glare, windows and other light sources should not be directly visible when sitting in front of the monitor. Reduce the amount of lighting in the room to match the computer screen.

Be sure to check out our large selection of high quality and designer eyeglasses!

Protect Eyes from UV Rays

Ultraviolet rays are a danger to skin and eyes year-round. They play a contributing factor to skin damage, skin cancer and eye disorders such as cataracts. It’s important to keep in mind with kids out of school and outdoor activities planned, especially during the summer months.

“The more time you spend outdoors without protecting your eyes, the greater your risk for ocular damage,” says Dr. James Winnick, an optometrist. Rather than avoid the problem entirely by seeking refuge inside, take steps to mitigate your risk in the sun.

Consider Risk Factors

While all people need to protect their eyes from UV radiation, some populations are more sensitive than others to the sun. For example, children don’t yet have the natural protection in their eyes that adults have. That means they get most of their exposure before they are 18 years old.

Experts say it doesn’t matter who you are, protecting your eyes outdoors is crucial.

Reflecting Light is a Concern

Sunlight is reflected off water, sidewalks, buildings — almost everything — and it goes in every direction. While sunglasses and photochromic lenses protect from UV light passing through the front of the lenses, a new trend in eye protection takes on the back side of lenses as well.

A special anti-reflective treatment can now be added to the back of lenses that helps prevent UV radiation from reflecting off of them and into your eyes. The great news is that some lens brands, like UNITY, offer this “backside UV” treatment at no additional cost depending on the options you choose for your new photochromic lenses.

Don’t wait for UV exposure to get the best of your eye health. Just as you use sunblock, you should have some protection for your eyes throughout the day. This May, take steps to better protect your family.

Sunglasses at Performance Eyecare

At Performance Eyecare, we carry over 700 pairs of high quality and designer eyeglasses and sunglasses in our state-of-the-art optical centers in St. Louis and the Metro East St. Louis, Illinois areas. We have eyeglasses of all price ranges, including high-end fashion frames made from the latest materials.

Some of the designer lines we carry include: Maui Jim, Fossil, X-Games, Lafont, L.A. Eyeworks, Tom Ford, Armani Exchange, Michael Kors, Callaway, Oliver Peoples, Jaguar, Silhouette, OGI and Tom Davies.

All of our eyeglasses are covered by an unconditional warranty and we always stand behind every pair of eyeglasses should you not be completely satisfied.

Click here to schedule an appointment!

Visual Freedom Starts Here

Non-Surgical Vision Correction

If you are looking for a safe, non-invasive option to better eyesight, you may want to consider our alternate, non-surgical visual correction surgery which is also known as the vision retainer shaping system. This is the process of utilizing retainer contact lens that corrects your overall vision while you are asleep!

You may be asking yourself, “what is the difference between lasik eye surgery, and non-surgical vision correction?” And the answer is this:

  1. Vision Retainer Shaping System is less than half the cost of a laser vision eye surgery.
  2. Good news! The non-surgical method involves zero post pain.
  3. You will not experience any hazy or blurred vision once complete.
  4. Both of your eyes can be corrected in the same visit!
  5. No use, or need for steroid or other drugs as there are with laser surgery patients.
  6. We saved the best for last! This retainer contact lens is reversible, whereas surgical correction is not!

Our team can help you determine if you are a candidate. We also offer a free consultation! It is important to keep in mind that VRSS is not suitable for everyone, and needs to be performed by a qualified & licensed eye care expert, like Dr. Massie. This non-surgical vision repair is safe for all ages, including children and older adults. To see a list of the eye health insurance plans we accept, call our nearby office today! The road to visual freedom is only an appointment away!

Summer Fashion Trends

Performance Eyecare has the summer fashion trends in sunglasses. Looking to go to the beach or head on vaca? Stand out from the crowd with the latest summer trends in sunglasses.

There’s a style for everyone this summer from mirrored lens to rounded, extra-large frames to acetate semi-sheer frames. Those styles along with sculpture-like, ombre frames, mannish-styled, vintage inspired and edgy silhouettes are in this season.

Here’s what’s “in”:

Rounded frames

Round-shaped sunglasses have become popular recently and were highlighted at a variety of recent fashion shows.

Classic Cat Eye

These fashionable glasses are a blast from the past. The vintage-inspired are popular in women for the bold colors but mostly the cat-eye shape.

Oversized frames

Oversized frames are a quick way to make a fashion statement. The thick frame version of this style is extremely popular and offers a classy and trendy look that is bound to turn heads.

Other ‘in’ styles

  • Thick frames – Super thick frames are definitely in this season and come in a variety of fun shapes and classy looks.
  • Clear frames – White or light-colored rims is the one of the women’s fashion trends of 2014.
  • Mirrored lens – These add a splash of color and shine to any outfit.
  • Prints on frames – A classic pair of sunglasses couldn’t be trendier with printed or patterned frames.

The Top Five Reasons To Get Your Eyeglasses From Performance Eyecare!

There’s a lot more to purchasing glasses than picking out a frame and getting some lenses put in it.  You want to purchase a quality pair that is going to hold up while you wear them and last for a couple of years  And if something were to go wrong with them, you want it fixed.  You also want to feel good wearing eyeglasses, knowing they work well with your face, style and that they represent you.  This is where PERFORMANCE EYECARE comes in.  We can take away the stress of worrying about all of these things while picking out your eyewear.

In fact, we’ve compiled a list as to why you should buy your next eyeglasses (and sunglasses) from us!  Check it out.

Reason #1: We’ve Got the Best Selection of Frames in the Metro-East

Our optical selection is one of the best in the area with over 700 quality eyeglasses and sunglasses to choose from. Whatever your style or budget is, we are confident that we have several frames that you will love.

Reason #2: Our Opticians Are Specially-Trained to Fit You in a Frame

We have a custom selection-process to fit your optical needs and our non-commissioned opticians pick frames for you according to your face shape, skin tone, brow structure, and so much more! We also have the ability to fit you into specialty eyewear, including sport sunglasses, sport goggles, and even scuba goggles!

Reason #3: We Have Our Own Eyeglass Laboratory

We make eyeglasses in the office with our state-of-the-art edging instruments. We can grind lenses for most prescriptions in our office to ensure the best quality. This also decreases turnaround time so that your new eyeglasses are ready sooner.

Reason #4: We Carry Quality Products

Like most products, there is a wide spectrum of quality among lenses and frames in the optical industry. We offer the most technologically advanced lenses that allow you to see your absolute best. Our frames are that of the highest quality, which hold adjustments. They’re built to last for many years to come.

Reason #5: Five-Star Warranty You Won’t See Anywhere Else

We are so confident in our eyeglasses that we carry a 2-year warranty on lenses and frames at no additional cost. If your glasses break, simply bring them back and your glasses will be repaired or replaced for free. We also offer a 60-day exchange policy, so if you decide you don’t like the shape or color, you can return it for another frame. If new lenses are required, a small lab regrinding fee will be charged depending on the type of lens you require.

If you’re ready to buy your eyeglasses now or even if you simply have more questions about what we do, don’t hesitate a minute longer! We can help you find eyeglasses that you will love!

 

Toy Related Eye Injuries

Each year, children are emitted into the hospital due to eye injuries due to toy relations. Nearly half of these injuries are to the head and face, and many are eye injuries. Toy related injuries are often sustained by children 5 years of age and under.

Online surveys conducted by All About Vision revealed that 41% of parents either hardly or rarely considered eye safety when shopping & selecting toys for their kids. Keep in mind that when these same parents were asked if they thought the toys their kids currently had at home could potentially cause eye damage, 54% of them answered definitely, and 22% said possibly. Injuries to the eyes due to toy mishaps may include scratches to the surface, also known as corneal abrasion; or a more serious injury can occur such as bleeding inside of the eye, traumatic cataracts or corneal ulcers.

As you prepare for Christmas this year, keep in mind these 6 toys that pose a higher risk for eye injury than others, especially is these toys are used without adult supervision and/or assistance

Performance Eyecare, Maryland Heights eye doctor

Silly String, also known as Aerosol String – If this string enters the eye it can cause an irritation or possibly even lead to pink eye due to the chemical in the product.

Toys That Can Cause Harm To The Eye, Performance Eyecare St. Louis, Performance Eyecare Maryland Heights
Children’s Fishing Poles– These can be especially dangerous to other nearby children. These should always be used with adult supervision. Example toys may include Catch of the Day.

Girl in bubble bath, foam
Party foam – This chemical can cause a burn to the eyes that can result in red eyes, blurred vision and eye infection.